Instrumentation Development

Instrumentation Development is a critical part of BRI. We regularly push the boundaries of the state of the art to achieve our goals; working hard to ensure that our technology is effective and meets the needs driven by today’s prominent environmental issues. By emphasizing the development of novel instrumentation we provide new research capabilities and strive to significantly improve current technologies in their fundamental aspects such as accuracy, precision, resolution, throughput, and flexibility.

BRI develops instrumentation targeted at system integration, communication, calibration, and field validation; we are well equipped to handle a variety of projects. BRI possesses a range of facilities readily available including an in-house machine shop, 3D printing capabilities, a gas analysis lab, and sufficient computing power to meet data processing needs. This allows for quick and effective instrumentation development; with fast iteration times providing a successful prototyping, fabrication, and validation cycle.

Developments include benthic sonar observatories for deployment in the Arctic and the North Sea, patented novel oil spill remote sensing, oil spill mitigation, and oil spill quantification technologies. State of the art measurement instrumentation include oceanographic bubble fluxes from sea beds, and bubble measurement from shallow to deep waters. Also the development of the AMOG (Automobile Trace Gas) Surveyor a modified commuter car developed to validate satellite greenhouse gas observations by recording fast, high quality meteorology and trace gas concentrations at the fastest legal driving speed. AMOG algorithms and design have been developed from extensive field experience, to solve real-world science problems.

AMOG Surveyor developed by
Bubbleology Research International to
validate satellite observations (photograph
courtesy of Ira Leifer).

AMOG Surveyor. Top Left Inset. Real time display and rear video.
Top Right Inset. Cockpit view. (Photograph courtesy of Ira Leifer).